Jersey – The Channel Island Way I

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I’d arrived in Jersey mid-afternoon the day before to louring skies, having departed from a very sunny Manchester just over an hour before. (Sunny Manchester, cloudy Jersey – surely some mistake?) I’d had a bit of a look around St. Helier, been treated to a sumptuous evening meal at our hotel and had met, and been royally entertained by two masters of the anecdote, blue badge guide Arthur Lamy and fellow blogger Alan Sloman. All we needed now was a change in the weather so that we could see the coastal path at it’s best and have the light for some decent photos. And fortunately that’s exactly what happened.

Our first walk quickly brought us to a headland from where we could see beautiful coastline, azure seas, the French coast and oodles of history…

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The boulders in the foreground are Le Dolmen du Couperon. A late Neolithic gallery grave built around 5000 years ago….

I could go on, but:

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If you want to read the small print, click on the photo to see a larger version on flickr. (The same applies to all of the pictures in recent posts – technical wizardry which I picked up after a not very technical ‘technical discussion’ with my friend the Shandy Sherpa.)

The building behind is a Victorian public convenience, or in the local patios – Jèrriais – known as a kharzi….

Alternatively…

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The bit about Jèrriais is true though – it is a Jersey patois, although apparently not many people speak it today.

There didn’t seem to be much, well anything really, that Arthur didn’t know about Jersey, but if you were walking the route without a guide, the historic sites are well supplied with information boards and it’s all in Arthur’s excellent guidebook too. You wouldn’t get the more recent gossip however, or be introduced to Arthur’s friends and relations who seemed to be everywhere (Jersey is a small place after all), but were particularly thick on the ground here in the parish of St. Martin, Arthur’s home patch.

It was apparent why this headland would be chosen to site a battery since it has commanding views of the Normandy coast, just 14 miles away, and the reefs and low islands in the intervening straits.

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Which of course, for the walker, makes it an ideal place to pause for a gander.

On the next section of the walk, on minor roads, the verges were decorated with these….

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..cyclamen. I was confused at first by the lack of leaves and because I thought that cyclamen were spring flowering, but apparently cyclamen are hysteranthous, which means that the leaves appear after the flowers, and different species of cyclamen can be found flowering all through the year. Cyclamen are not native to Britain, or to the Channel Isles, but they have naturalised and are clearly thriving here. The English name, which I didn’t know, is sowbread, because pigs like to eat the tubers.

Many of the fields we walked past had produced their crop of Jersey Royals earlier in the year and were now planted with barley, but full of wildflowers too.

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As Alan pointed out, there was a distinctive earthy tang in the air which instantly brought to mind fresh new season potatoes – maybe it’s something in the sandy Jersey soil.

At…

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…we passed the first of numerous round towers we would see during our stay.

Fliquet Tower

The white paint is there to provide a landmark for seafarers.

Fliquet Bay

Looking back to Fliquet.

Over coffees and tea at the cafe at St. Catherine’s, Arthur told us the history of the breakwater here – part of an abortive attempt to build a huge harbour here, ostensibly for the fishing fleet, but actually intended for the British Navy to deter French aggression. Topically, Alan recalled working on the construction of a similarly over-large ‘fishing’ harbour in Libya.

Our route then shadowed the coast on the sea wall…

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The house on the right was a hospital built to treat the many men, and their families, who worked on the breakwater. I think. Like the rest my attempts to recall Jersey history – if it’s accurate then the credit is entirely Arthur’s, and if it’s not then the fault lies solely with my dodgy memory. In my defence – there was an awful lot of history to soak up!

I’m going to stop here, despite the fact that I haven’t even managed to get Alan and myself to our (delectable) lunch on our first day’s walking. More to follow….

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Jersey – The Channel Island Way I

6 thoughts on “Jersey – The Channel Island Way I

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      I’m glad that it does, because it was – obviously in the circumstances I really wanted to like it, but fortunately that was easy!

  1. beatingthebounds says:

    Hi Kenny,
    Alan and I talked about what kind of walkers would enjoy the Channel Island Way and I must admit that after our experience you did spring to mind – the combination of lovely walking and epicurean delights seemed tailored to your tastes.
    Not sure how the Fat Dog would fare!

  2. Looks like a stunning destination and a quality coastal walk – even for a “journalist”. So lucky to see them at their best in the sunshine

    Strange to realise that the Channel Islands are much closer to France than they are to England. Is there much French inflluence on the island in the language, culture, food etc

    Onwards to the next thrilling instalment

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      French was the main language until surprisingly recently (although we’re still talking in terms of centuries rather than decades.) Place names and street names are generally French. Culture and food – I’m not sure, I didn’t notice anyone riding a bike in a beret and striped shirt with a string of onions around their neck. I ate a lot of fish – which is unheard of. I’m wishing now that I’d been a bit more adventurous and tried lobster (and not just because somebody else was paying – it looked to be priced very reasonably to my admittedly fairly ignorant eye). The fortifications are all aimed at detering a French invasion after there was an attempted invasion, defeated at the battle of Jersey in 1781. Aside that is from the concrete ones built during the German occupation.

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