Roeburndale – Bluebells, Bogs, Barns, Birds and Blueskies!

Bluebells Outhwaite Wood

After our visit to Roeburndale last year I promised myself a return visit this spring. I chose the bank holiday weekend, thinking that even then this would be a quiet spot – and it was.

No map for this walk – you can find it here, on a helpful leaflet, one of many about Lancashire walks stored on this website. We followed the walk as described, except we walked the big loop anticlockwise.

The leaflet mentions parking by Bridge House Farm tearoom, which now seems to be part of a garden centre. TBH and I (the kids were terrorising their grandparents for the weekend) couldn’t resist a leisurely start with a pot of tea, and a cherry scone for TBH, in the dappled sunlight on the decking by the river. Very civilised. If you find yourself in the area, the lunches looked very appetising too.

Early purple orchid

More by luck than judgement, we’d timed our visit to perfection. Not only was the sun shining, but the bluebells in Outhwaite Wood looked and smelled absolutely stunning. Dotted about amongst them were early purple orchids too,

River Roeburn

The gorse too was throwing off a heady aroma, redolent of coconut. The woods were busy with birdsong.

River Roeburn II

The route takes advantage of a permission path which is way-marked with small green discs, each decorated with a white silhouette of a deer’s head.

Female large red damsfley

This damselfly had me confused, but I’m almost certain that it’s a female large red damselfly, which are apparently quite varied in their markings. This one is green on it’s abdomen rather than the more usual black, but the yellow stripes and red banding are right. The British Dragonfly website was helpful, although…

Can be found in almost any freshwater habitat but rarely on fast-flowing rivers or streams.

…has me a little concerned, since I would say that the Roeburn is best described as fast-flowing.

Path through the Ramsons

In places the carpet of bluebells gave way to the broad leaves and white stars of ramsons; and the sweet smell of the Hyacinthoides non-scripta was over-whelmed by a pungent waft of garlic.

Negotiating a boggy bit

More bluebells in Outhwaite Wood

A path through the bluebells

The path climbs to the top edge of the wood, where we found a sunny spot for a picnic.

The upper edge of the wood

The path then drops down to cross the river on a footbridge.

River Roeburn again

This was where I brought the kids last year. There was a family party here on this occasion too, some paddling in the river, most sunning themselves on the bank. They didn’t seem to be under-attack in the way that we had been almost exactly a year ago.

Roeburndale

We left the woods here, and crossed the river…

River Roeburn from Barkin Bridge

…by Barkin Bridge.

A bright flash of white and a strident song from nearby trees alerted me to the presence of….

Pied Flycatcher II

…a male pied flycatcher.

Pied Flycatcher I

I was half hoping to see a redstart, which are also found in these woods apparently, but that will have to wait for another time.

Roeburndale Chapel

By the tiny Roeburndale chapel we turned to head across rough and reedy pastures, past a couple of broken eggshells (whether they were evidence of a family triumph or tragedy I’m not sure)…..

Eggshell

…to a tributary stream named both Pedder Gill and Goodber Beck on my map.

Waterfall - Pedder Gill / Goodber Beck

The return journey, above Roeburndale, was enlivened by the spectacular escapades of stunting lapwings..

Lapwings

Lapwing

…and the burbling calls and swift low flights of curlews.

A number of very substantial barns…

Bowland Barn

…fabulous views….

Above Roeburndale

,,,both near and far….

Lousewort

Wray Wood Moor

What’s that on the horizon?

Ingleborough

Ingleborough!

Another Bowland Barn

Which was fortunate, because parts of it were tediously wet and boggy. Next time I think I’ll try the path on the west side, on the slopes of Caton Moor. Or, I could go up to the access land and climb to the top of Caton Moor…..

Further exploration is called for!

————————————————————————————————————

We’d started late that day and were very late back. I was quite proud of the chowder which I threw together with some smoked mackerel which was languishing in the fridge, some prawns frozen in a lump at the bottom of a freezer draw and various odds and ends of veg. Which is my cheesy way of working in a link to today’s Food Programme (see what I did there?). I’m not generally a fan, but caught it in the car and found it very thought provoking. It featured an interview with Michael Pollan about his latest book ‘Cooked’ which received a rave review in the Guardian this weekend. If you have half an hour to spare I recommend listening to it.

It certainly galvanised me today. When I got home, I picked up the kids from school and then got them to make tea. B barbecued some chicken drumsticks and some lamb chops, A made potato salad and tomato salad and S washed and dressed some ‘cabbage’ (lettuce to you and I) with a dressing he’d made himself, and was also generally helpful. (‘I think I did the most jobs’ as he modestly put it.) Yes I helped them. And, no, A didn’t lop off any fingers when she was chopping spuds and B didn’t burn himself (or the meat). I think they had a real sense of achievement. And they subsequently ate things they would otherwise have just poked suspiciously and moved around their plates.

It wasn’t their first experience of cooking. It certainly isn’t going to be their last.

Nothing to do with walking, I know. But expect more rambling off message. Possibly. Or not

Amended:

Andy and I were talking about TED talks just the other day. Here’s one by Michael Pollan about a plant’s eye view of Darwinism:

Roeburndale – Bluebells, Bogs, Barns, Birds and Blueskies!

12 thoughts on “Roeburndale – Bluebells, Bogs, Barns, Birds and Blueskies!

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      By coincidence I had this year’s first major hay fever attack today. It was a stunning day – a fair bit quieter than the Camino I imagine!

      1. I imagine so!

        It’d be nice if we got some more nice, clear warm days – when it happens, it’s some of the best weather we get for being out and about.

        1. beatingthebounds says:

          In my book, nothing beats this time of year if the sun shines. The weekend is almost upon us – can’t wait.

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      I think everything is late this year – but worth waiting for. When I lived in Central Manchester and relied on public transport Lyme Park was one of a handful of places I used to head to for days out. Not sure that I ever timed it right to catch the bluebells though.

  1. Splendid! Never heard of Roeburndale so followed your route on the map. Looks well worth an explore. Perhaps with the Family. And some friends. Around let’s say late May. Now if only I had somewhere to stay nearby. Any ideas?

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      I’m racking my brains……
      It would be a great place to go – especially if the bluebells are late again. Can’t promise you red kite, but lapwings and curlew are probably almost guaranteed, and if we have B with us, probably a host of interesting creepy-crawlies: he spotted loads when I brought the kids here this time last year. (Come on the wrong day, however, and you will get eaten alive.)

  2. What a lovely area and another to add to my ever expanding list of places to visit. There are plenty of Bluebells out over here, but Damselflies of any kind are few and far between. Summer seems to have now reverted to sunshine and showers again.

  3. […] I’ve been thinking of veering off topic and posting something about food for while, but this post was finally precipitated by another Radio 4 programme. I thought I’d get something out there whilst that programme was still available on the iplayer. This week’s ‘Book of the Week’ is Yuval Noah Harari’s ‘Sapiens’. The third programme, ‘The Agricultural Revolution’ suggests that wheat wasn’t domesticated by mankind, but rather the reverse, and that wheat (and other food plants) have duped us into accepting a fairly raw deal in order to provide the conditions in which they can flourish. This is pretty much the case that Michael Pollan was making in the TED talk I embedded in my earlier post. […]

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