Pulchritudinous Pruinosity

Lambert’s Meadow – Bank Well – The Row – Myer’s Allotment.

Later that day: A Tour of Trowbarrow


Ragged Robin


A Green-veined White on Cuckooflower.

Cuckooflower is one of the food-plants for the caterpillars of Green-veined  White. This butterfly was flitting from Cuckooflower t0 Cuckooflower, ignoring the many other blooms on offer. Green-veined Whites favour damp areas, which makes Lambert’s Meadow a perfect environment for them.


Emerald Damselfly (I think).

At Myer’s Allotment my every step seemed to raise clouds of damselflies. Once landed again, they weren’t always easy to pick out against the ground, despite, in some cases, their vivid metallic colouration.


Common Blue Damselfly.


The Cinnabar.


Bee Fly.


Myer’s Allotment view.


Broad-bodied Chaser (again).


Black-tailed Skimmer.


A new dragonfly to me and therefore very exciting. This is either a female or an immature male. Males ‘develop a blue pruinescence on the abdomen darkening to the rear with S8-10 becoming black’. (This from the British Dragonfly Society website).

S8-10 refers to the eighth to tenth segments of the tail.

Pruinescence, or pruinosity, is a dusty looking coating on top of a surface. Well I never. I particularly like pruinosity and shall be using it at every suitable opportunity. ‘Look at the pruinosity on ‘ere!’ for example.


Another Green-veined White. (I think).


Common Blue.


Bird’s-foot Trefoil (with bee).


Fossilised Coral at Trowbarrow.


More Trowbarrow fossils.


I think that this might be a Tree Bumblebee, a species which only arrived here from Mainland Europe this century and has spread rapidly, helped by the profusion of bird-boxes in the UK, where it tends to build nests, even sometimes evicting resident Blue Tits in the process. (Yes, I know, the temptation to draw some kind of political parallel here would be almost overwhelming were I of the persuasion that we can somehow up-anchor and sail away across the Atlantic, as many people seem to be at present. But I’m not.)


Common Blue Damselfly.

Pulchritudinous Pruinosity

7 thoughts on “Pulchritudinous Pruinosity

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      Thank you Alan. We could do with some more sunshine so that I can get out to try to take some more!

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      I used to think I had several, although my capacity for rapid and excessive beer-guzzling has completely deserted me, and I can’t remember what the others ones were 😦 . I don’t have even a fraction of the patience which proper wildlife photographers must have. Keeps me busy though! (And away from the temptations of rapid and excessive beer-guzzling).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s