Skelwith Bridge and Little Langdale Stroll

Skelwith Bridge – Skelwith Force – Elter Water – Elterwater – Little Langdale – Slater Bridge – Stang End – High Park – Colwith Force – Skelwith Bridge.

P1160329

The Langdale Pikes seen across Elter Water. 

How appropriate, after a post about favourite walks, that in my next bit of catching up from the summer hols, I’m recounting a walk which, in slight variations, I’ve walked many times, in all seasons, in all weathers, alone on occasions but often with big groups of friends and which definitely qualifies at least as one of my favourites, particularly for when time is short, or the forecast is a bit iffy.

P1160328

Skelwith Force.

A dodgy forecast was partly responsible for us choosing this route. We were going out with our friends Beaver B and G and their family again; the original plan had been to get the boats out on one of the lakes, but with showers, possibly prolonged, expected, we decided that a low level walk was a better option. We’d actually run through a number of alternatives the night before and it was eventually G who suggested something in this area.

P1160339

Black and Yellow Longhorn Beetle (Leptura quadrifasciata).

This was spotted by Little B pretty much at the top of the track between Langdale and Little Langdale and it led us both a merry dance as we tried to photograph it in damp and gloomy conditions. It’s led me on another merry dance as I’ve tried to identify it – I was struck by it’s superficial resemblance to the Sexton beetle which I photographed recently, which wasn’t helpful because this is not even a closely related species.

We’d had drizzle, then a bright spell as we lunched by Elter Water, then rain as we climbed up and over into Little Langdale. Now it began to brighten up.

P1160342

Little Langdale Tarn.

P1160345

Slater Bridge.

Over Slater’s bridge and heading along Little Langdale we paused a while to watch cyclists riding their bikes through a ford on the infant River Brathay and then, a little further along, spotted a Roe deer down by the stream.

P1160355

Little Langdale. Blake Rigg on Pike O’Blisco and Busk Pike on Lingmoor behind.

P1160356

Stang End.

P1160357

The barn at Stang End with it’s impressive tiers of stacked fire wood.

Our perseverance through the rain was paying off now with some beautiful warm, sunny weather. The garden at Stang End was busy with Red Admiral and Peacock butterflies sunning themselves.

P1160362

High Park.

P1160366

P1160371

Colwith Force.

P1160374

Peacock butterfly.

We interrupted this large beetle, here already scuttling for cover, as it was preying on the earthworm seen in the top left of the picture.

P1160377

Here is the predator after I’d fetched him (or her) out of hiding…

P1160381

I’m reasonably sure that this is a Violet Ground Beetle, Carabus violaceus, although there are several very similar species of large, black beetles which also have that violet tint.

P1160388

I haven’t featured a Robin in the blog for an unusually long time. This one looks a bit tatty,  but juvenile Robins have speckled feathers, which are moulted at around two to three months, so could this be a juvenile, born in May or June, which has almost changed into adult plumage?

P1160392

P1160394

Almost back, crossing the footbridge near Skelwith Bridge.

P1160395

We were quite late finishing, having not set-off particularly early, and had wondered whether the promised tea and cake at Chesters By The River would be thwarted, but the new take-away section (well, new since I was last there) was still serving, so a mutiny by the kids was averted. I had the beluga lentil dish, seen near the front of the counter above, as an alternative to cake, and very nice it was too. Chesters, both cafe and shop, had been very busy when we had passed earlier and their success seems well deserved. If only they would reinstate the missing apostrophe in their name, I could thoroughly recommend a visit.

Skelwith Bridge and Little Langdale Stroll

14 thoughts on “Skelwith Bridge and Little Langdale Stroll

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      Absolutely. It would make more sense that it annoys me, if my own grasp of grammar were any better, but in the seventies I think grammar was considered ‘oppressive’ so I don’t recall being taught any at all. Doesn’t seem to hinder me when I’m telling other people that they’re wrong however!

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      Free beer? More Rachel Riley? (More jokes, would be my actual preference, but I think written comedy must be just about the hardest thing to do well.)

  1. mountaindiaries says:

    I love Skelwith, and definitely agree about Chesters – have been going for years and we always look forward to the ‘cake walk’!

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      Yes, opportunities for pleasant walks and good places to eat and/or drink abound in this part of the Lakes. Ideal for short winter days, or autumnal ones too – sounds like a plan!

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      Yes, some of it was. I regaled the kids with stories of trying to carry you back from Ambleside. They were highly impressed obviously.

        1. beatingthebounds says:

          A very memorable day/night, packed with incident. 11th October 1997, wasn’t it – we watched England play Italy in Rome, Paul Ince with his head bandaged, shades of Terry Butcher. Does that mean you’re coming up to 20 years wed? Or have I got it muddled, as usually seems to be the case these days?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s