Hutton Roof Crags from Holme

Not ‘Hutton Roof Crags from Home’ which is a post which I shall one day get around to, just as soon as I’ve found time to fit in a walk of that description, but rather an ascent of Hutton Roof from the village of Holme. I’ve added not one, but two maps at the bottom of the post to show my route, but it was, in brief: an overly long wander through Holme (thanks to a daft choice of parking spot); through Curwen Woods and past a house with, I’ve since discovered, gardens designed by Thomas Mawson; through the tiny hamlet of Clawthorpe; up through Lancelot Clark Storth to the top: down across Uberash Plain to pick up the path which skirts the north side of Holme Park Quarry; and finally a road walk in the dark back to the car.

Since this was an afternoon walk, after a Rugby match in the morning, I didn’t set-off until around two-thirty and initially was in no mood to stop to take photos. Until three signs on the one gate had me chuckling…

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…there was no Bull in the field (there rarely seems to be when there’s a sign), nor…

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…any sheep, nor…

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…any horses. Plenty of signs though.

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Slape Lane.

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Every time I climb Hutton Roof via Lancelot Clark Storth I seem to follow a different route. This time was no exception.

When I first spotted this…

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…from below, I thought that it was quite tall, perhaps some sort of tower, but it seemed to shrink as I approached. I assume that it’s a charcoal burners’ kiln.

It’s quite easy to get lost on Hutton Roof and I was glad to spot a series of small signs marking the route of an Audio Trail which I shall have to try some time.

The signs led me to this bench…

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…which, despite many visits, I’ve never encountered before.

What with the sunshine, and the flask of hot water and makings of a brew in my rucksack, I could hardly resist such an invitation to stop. Especially since the views had opened out behind me…

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The distant, snowy hills of the Lake District.

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Humphrey Head, Arnside Knott, Eaves Wood.

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From a little higher up – the Lakeland Fells again, but also Farleton Fell on the right.

Just short of the top, there’s a small enclosure of solar panels.

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Does the fence stop them escaping?

Given that this is a nature reserve I can’t imagine that any kind of large scale commercial operation is envisaged, so I wonder what is going on here?

The summit of Hutton Roof Crags has expansive views, despite it’s modest height. On this occasion, the Bowland hills were smothered by very black looking clouds, which looked a bit ominous. Ingleborough was also hidden by clouds. I thought maybe it was raining in that direction…

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The Middleton Fells.

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Howgills.

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Lakeland Hills and Whitbarrow Scar.

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Warton Crag and Morecambe Bay.

The path down towards the Clawthorpe Road dipped into hollows and between stands of shrubs and dense thickets of Gorse. I kept losing my view of the Bay and the sinking sun and rushed between each vantage point, taking photos at every opportunity.

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More impressive than the sunset itself was the way the underside of the clouds over the Lake District took on a warm orange glow…

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There’s room for quite a few cars to park around the top of the Clawthorpe Road and many of those spaces were still occupied. I was quite surprised, but then realised that there were a few other people out photographing the sunset. Some had come better prepared than me, with tripods.

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Heading down the hill, I was thinking that there’s still a lot of this ridge – Hutton Roof and Farleton Fell – that I haven’t explored. So plenty of excuse to come back.

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The paths had generally been wet and muddy, but the last section of track, with a barbed wire fence on either side, had vast puddles stretching right across it. I had little choice but to splash through them and my feet got a little damp, but it was a small price to pay.

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Slightly under 8 miles with 240m of ascent. Not bad after a late start on a short winter afternoon.

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Hutton Roof Crags from Holme

6 thoughts on “Hutton Roof Crags from Holme

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      I’m not sure which is more impressive – the flying dog or the 4by4 heading for Windermere on the Clawthorpe Fell Road.

  1. As you know I like Hutton Roof although you’ve still never taken me to Farelton Fell. I have a real hankering to climb it probably as it’s so prominent from the M6 south Lakes Junction. Love the dark moody cloud shots.

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      I don’t do Farleton Fell half as often as I do Hutton Roof. It’s a great place for a sit and a brew. We shall have to fix something up. I really want to do both of them in a circuit, possibly from home. (The kids want to do ‘The Three Peaks’ and we need some ‘training’ walks. I’m not sure how S, or me for that matter, will cope with the distance).

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