Scout Scar, Helsington Church, Brigsteer Woods

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Easter Monday was a bit of a wash out. We stayed in and played more games and chilled. Eventually, when the rain paused briefly, Andy and I set out on a wander around Eaves Wood. Of course, the weather had just been lulling us into a false sense of security and it was soon drizzling, and then chucking it down again. Everywhere was clarted up with mud again and, almost inevitably, one of my slips led to a proper both-feet-in-the-air-arse-in-the-mud pratfall. By that time I think we were both already considering giving up and heading home, but that banished any doubts and we made a beeline for dry clothes and hot tea with me looking and feeling like Swamp Thing.

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I didn’t take many photos. Just one in fact, of some puddles in our driveway…

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The Tuesday was forecast to start in much the same way, but then brighten up. We’d already arranged to meet The Tower Captain and his daughter S for a walk; the Surfnslide crew decided that they would stay another day to squeeze in one more walk and catch up with TTC. I didn’t fancy another walk in the rain (I’m not sure anyone else was all that keen either) so we elected to wait for the weather to improve before we set off. We were just finishing our lunchtime soup, watching it still rain through the kitchen windows, and cursing the forecasters, when the rain finally stopped, right on queue. We left a car at the southern end of Brigsteer Woods, piled into the other two cars and parked those in the smaller of the two car parks on the Underbarrow – Kendal road. That car park is in a small, old quarry. Almost inevitably, the DBs saw this as a brilliant opportunity to do some climbing and scare the wits out of the rest of us.

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A very small climb soon brings you out on the highest part of Scout Scar, which has marvellous views of the higher hills of the lake District.

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We were a sociable group of ten, or twelve if you count TTC’s two dogs.

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This…

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…is The Mushroom, a shelter built in 1912 to commemorate the Coronation of King George V. The inside of the rim of the roof has a pictorial topograph which picks out the many hills and places which can be seen from this relatively modest top.

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Scout Scar panoramas. Click on these, or any other photos, to see larger images on flickr.

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Almost inevitably (there’s a theme emerging here surely?), despite the sunshine, there was a cold wind blowing. Little S thought maybe he could use his coat to glide on it.

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Unlike Whitbarrow, on Scout Scar there’s a path right along the edge. We were walking south, away from the Lakeland fells, but the temptation was always there to turn back to admire the view along the edge back to those hills.

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Not that the view the other away was at all shabby…

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Scout Scar, Kent Estuary, Arnside Knott.

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Arnside Knott, Lyth Valley, River Gilpin, Whitbarrow. Meadow Ant mounds in the foreground.

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The ‘new’ wetland at Park Moss.

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St. John’s Church, Helsington, built in 1726.

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These painted Royal coats-of-arms are a feature of the small, rural churches in this area. Both Witherslack Church and St. Anthony’s on Cartmell Fell have them too. This one is the coat-of-arms of King William IV, crowned in 1830.

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Mural, painted in 1919 by Miss Saumarez.

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Park Moss and Whitbarrow Scar.

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The paths through Brigsteer Woods were something of a quagmire, not surprisingly after a day and a half of rain. But there was some compensation in the form of the daffodils which fill some parts of these woods at this time of year.

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A short walk, but one packed with interest.

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We had to rush back, not just because the Surfnslide party had a long homeward journey to undertake, but also because TTC had one final treat for our long-weekend planned, to wit a trip up the village church tower. I made it as far as the first floor…

 

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…but declined the rather spindly looking ladder and the balancing act around the bells above to get to the roof. The photos I took didn’t come out too well, but The Tower Captain really looks in his element here doesn’t he?

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Scout Scar, Helsington Church, Brigsteer Woods

10 thoughts on “Scout Scar, Helsington Church, Brigsteer Woods

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      And well supplied with benches – the National Trust seem to have gone to town here! I’ve never seen even a fraction of them in use. Maybe on a hot day when people fancy a picnic? This is another place I shall have to bring my stove and some pack-up.

  1. A cracking walk, and fun trip into the tower to finish off an excellent long weekend. The rest of the holidays have been a flat by comparison. Still surprised that these edges seem so little walked, they are truly superb. A long summer amble taking a couple of the pubs for a cheeky beer would be an excellent plan

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      Well – that sounds like a blinding idea. The Mason Arms beckons. Lord knows how we will fit it in though!

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      It’s fantastic – our kids are the youngest amongst our group of old Uni friends, but we meet up several times a year and they’re close enough together to rub along well. They’ve even started to organise their own things now.

  2. I woke quite early this morning and have had a delightfully enjoyable time catching up on your blog. This post has taken me down memory lane. Sadly a very hazy lane. I’m 90%sure I walked Scouts Scar, back in 1976. Looking for proof in old diaries and photos, has filled me with nostalgia for the wonderful 3 autumn months I spent working in Grasmere at that time. 3 months that were wet, wet and wetter! I shall keep searching for proof.
    Love the daffodils and I am waiting to see the bluebells.

    1. beatingthebounds says:

      What a lovely thought – bluebells are almost upon us. Although I think the deer have eaten most of the ones in our garden. It’s definitely a feature of this part of the world – wet, wet, and more wet.

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