A Langdale Round

20220418_091319
White Stones – The Band. Crinkle Crags and Bowfell hidden in the cloud, but Rossett Pike is clear on the right of the photo.

Easter Monday. The forecast was a bit mixed, but generally for improvement throughout the day. I had big plans, so I’d set off early and was parked up in the National Trust carpark by the Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotel while there was still plenty of room.

20220418_091323
Pike of Blisco.
20220418_091340
Side Pike.

As I walked up the road towards Blea Tarn the cloud lifted off the Langdale Pikes, but it was cold and pretty gloomy.

20220418_092800
Langdale Pikes.

The Langdale Pikes would dominate the view for much of the early part of the walk, and then again towards the end. I took a lot of photographs of the iconic crags.

20220418_092806
Redacre Gill.

My route up Pike O’Blisco curls right behind the stand of trees and then follows the gill into the obvious deep cleft right of centre.

I’ve been thinking a lot recently about the incredible standard of the paths in the Lakes. This was an easy one to follow at a lovely gradient. somebody did a very fine job of making it.

It was spitting with rain now and again and my cag went on and off a few times.

20220418_095652
A well constructed path.
20220418_095835
Kettle Crag, Langale Pikes, Side Pike.

I seem to have stopped taking panorama shots for a while, without really deciding to, but I took loads on this walk. If you click on them, or on any of the other pictures for that matter, you’ll see a larger version on Flickr.

20220418_100532
Side Pike and Lingmoor.
20220418_100733
Side-streams, in often quite deep ravines, with lots of little waterfalls, abounded. This area would definitely repay further exploration.
20220418_102942
Pike O’Blisco.

As I reached the top of the gully and the angle levelled off, the weather turned temporarily a bit grim. I have several photos obviously taken in the rain. Fortunately, it was short-lived, and when the sun appeared once again, it had wet rocks to sparkle on.

20220418_103944
The Langdale Pikes again!
20220418_104633
Lingmoor with Fairfield Horseshoe beyond and a glimpse of Windermere.
20220418_111305
Pike O’Blisco summit.

The wind was blowing from the west, so those large slabs just below the summit offered superb shelter. I settled down, leaning against one of them, poured myself a hot cordial and video-called my Dad to wish him a happy birthday.

20220418_111543
Langdale Pikes and a rainbow.

It was soon raining again, but I had a well-sheltered spot and it didn’t seem to matter too much somehow.

20220418_111634
Rainbow panorama.
20220418_114717
Red Tarn and Cold Pike.

Cold Pike was my next target. I decided to take the path which angles up towards the head of Browney Gill, but then strike left when the angle eased.

20220418_120621
Red Tarn again. Wet Side Edge behind, which is heading up to Great Carrs, hidden in the cloud.
20220418_122943
Looking back to Pike O’Blisco. The broken crags on the left look like they might give a good scrambling route.
20220418_124352
Pike O’Blisco disappearing into the cloud, from near the top of Cold Pike.

I found another sheltered spot on Cold Pike for another quick stop. The clouds blew in once again. The weather was changing very quickly.

20220418_124609
Pike O’Blisco from Cold Pike. The Helvellyn and Fairfield range behind.
20220418_130216
Looking back to Cold Pike.
20220418_131815
Pike O’Blisco and Cold Pike. Wetherlam behind.
20220418_131844
Panorama from the same spot.
20220418_133040
The many tarns of Stonesty Pike. The Duddon Estuary, Harter Fell, Whitfell and Black Combe behind.
20220418_133920
Crinkle Crags.
20220418_134052
Upper Eskdale and the Scafells.
20220418_134148
The ‘Bad Step’. There were a couple of guys standing beneath it, having quite a lengthy discussion before deciding to follow the path around to the left. I went round too. I’ve been both up and down that way in the past and I don’t remember it being all that difficult.
20220418_135318
Bowfell just about out of the cloud.
20220418_135611
Lingmoor and Pike O’Blisco. Windermere beyond.
20220418_135616
The Duddon Valley and Harter Fell.
20220418_135755
Langdale, Lingmoor and Pike o’Blisco.
20220418_135848
Panorama – Scafells, Bowfell, Langdale Pikes, Langdale, Pike O’Blisco, Windermere, Coniston Fells.

There are a lot of ups and downs on Crinkle Crags. The scenery is fantastically rocky, but it does mean you really have to concentrate over where you are putting your feet to avoid taking a tumble.

20220418_142358
Scafells.

If the Langdale Pikes had kept drawing my eye during the early part of the walk, it was now Scafell and Scafell Pike which were hogging my attention.

The weather hadn’t been too bad, but it was getting bluer and brighter…

20220418_144228
Scafells again.
20220418_145114
Bowfell.
20220418_145747
Scafells and Bowfell panorama.
20220418_151807
Pike O’Blisco and Wetherlam.
20220418_152355
Pike O’Blisco, Crinkle Crags and Three Tarns.
20220418_152854
Langdale Pikes from Bowfell. Helvellyn and Fairfield range behind.
20220418_154217
Esk Pike, Grasmoor, Allen Crags, Glaramara, Skiddaw, Blencathra.
20220418_154431
Scafells.
20220418_154619
Langdale Pikes, Langdale, Lingmoor, Windermere.
20220418_155955
Pike O’Blisco, Wetherlam, Coniston Old Man, Crinkle Crags, Dow Crag.
20220418_161954
Esk Pike.

I know that the geology of the Lake District is quite complex, with some igneous rocks, lots of slate, periods when the area was underwater and sedimentary rocks were laid down, three separate periods of orogeny lifting the hills, glaciation etc – but I don’t often feel like I know what I’m looking at. The rocks on this walk seemed to change quite often.This large boulder, in Ore Gap had lots of parallel striations which make me think it must be sedimentary. And yet we’re in the central part of the hills, close to Borrowdale, where I thought the rock would be volcanic?

20220418_162007
Sedimentary, my dear Watson?

I have a book on the shelf in front of me, ‘Lakeland Rocky Rambles’, which I’ve never really dipped in to – hmm, could be a new project.

20220418_164633
Dale Head, Maiden Moor, Allen Crag, Glaramara, Derwentwater, Skiddaw, Blencathra. (And Many more!)
20220418_164639
Looking back to Bowfell and Crinkle Crags from Esk Pike.
20220418_165522
Great End, Great Gable, Green Gable, Grasmoor and more of the North-western fells.
20220418_171745
Langdale Pikes,Rossett Pike, Bowfell.
20220418_174946
Angle Tarn panorama.
20220418_181217
Panorama from Rossett Pike.
20220418_181515
Langdale Pikes, Langdale and Lingmoor from just below the summit of Rossett Pike.
20220418_181510
Buck Pike and Black Pike – my descent route.
20220418_181539
Another panorama.

I think it’s 11 years since I was last on Rossett Pike. Back then, I didn’t get too much of a view, but I did have my one and only (so far) close encounter with a Dotterel. That was also towards the end of a walk, and thinking back, I’m pretty sure that whilst I may not be particularly fit, I am at least fitter now than I was then.

20220418_182433
Buck Pike.
20220418_183910
Pike O’Stickle and Mickleden.

I picked up a path which skirted below Black Crag and kept me in the sun for a bit longer. It was a great way down, never too steep, and deposited me on the path down from Stake Pass which has superb zig-zags. Once down in the valley I followed two walkers, one of whom was barefoot. I met another barefoot walker a couple of weeks later. I quite like the idea, but I think I would probably stub my toes roughly every five minutes.

I wasn’t quite dark when I arrived back at the car, but it wasn’t far off.

Around the head of Langdale.

Some hike stats:

MapMyWalk gives a little over 13 miles (although once again, confusingly, the numbers on the map make it look closer to 25 km i.e. well over 15 miles. Who knows.) The app also suggests 1162m of ascent, which is definitely an underestimate. For a slightly different route, over exactly the same hills, Walking Englishman gives 12 miles and 1466m of ascent. I think the truth, for the climbing at least, lies somewhere between those two figures. The fact that they differ by around a 1000 feet is a bit shicking!

It was far enough, at least, to leave me feeling pleasantly tired by the end.

Despite all the effort, there are ‘only’ six Wainwrights, to wit: Pike O’Blisco, Cold Pike, Crinkle Crags, Bowfell, Esk Pike and Rossett Pike.

There’s lots more Birketts because all of the Crinkles are on the list. And some of the bobbles on the ridge down from Rossett Pike – but I wasn’t very careful about which of either of those I actually visited, so I shan’t list them on this occasion.

Leaving aside all of the stats, it was an absolutely superb day which will live very long in the memory. All day long I was thinking that this area is definitely the best bit of the Lakes. But I was thinking much the same thing when I did the Coledale Horseshoe, so I think all we can conclude is that I’m fickle!

Advertisement
A Langdale Round

The Old Man in the Rain

20220122_085142
Coniston Water.

The forecast was promising: ‘Low cloud, with a strong chance of cloud inversions on larger fells, particularly in the South.’ I was hooked (line and sinker!) and was out early and parked up in the car park at the top of the metalled part of the Walna Scar road. Despite the early hour, not long after eight, the car park was already pretty busy and filling up fast.

The OS map shows a path climbing the southern slopes of The Old Man, skirting the quarry and joining the more popular route above Low Water. In fact, there are lots of minor paths and if you pick one which heads further west you can keep plodding up through interesting terrain to Old Man Breast and then the top.

20220122_090015
Limestone Haws.

I was suspicious of what seemed like quite high cloud for an inversion, but continued to climb hopefully.

20220122_092710
The view begins to disappear.

Once entered, the mist turned out to be the sort of mist which has you soaked through before you’ve fully realised just how wet it is. Still, it remained quite pleasant. I sat by the enormous summit cairn on the Old Man, looking at the lack of view and willing the cloud to clear, whilst I supped a couple of cups of cordial from my flask.

Then I set off along the ridge, over Brim Fell to Swirl How. The weather gradually deteriorated. Not only did the fine mist turn to a heavy downpour, but the wind picked up too so that the freezing cold rain was driven horizontally across the ridge.

20220122_111133
The cairn on Swirl How.

It was all a bit horrible. In different circumstances, I might have done an out-and-back to Great Carrs, and I originally intended to include Wetherlam, but now I just wanted to get off the hill.

20220122_111139
The ‘view’ along the ridge.

Fortunately, once I started to descend Prison Band I dropped out of the worst of the wind, and although it continued to rain, on and off, without the driving wind it didn’t seem so bad.

I chatted to a couple of chaps who asked if they were on Prison Band (I’m not sure where else they could have been?).

“What’s it like on the ridge?”

“Wild.”

“Yep, it was pretty foul on Wetherlam,” they chuckled, before continuing on up.

20220122_120223
Re-emerging from the mist.

From that point, I enjoyed the rest of the walk, rain or no rain. Showers kept sweeping through, but they were less and less frequent.

20220122_120718
Levers Water.

The sharp showers made patterns on the surface of Levers Water and I watched them being driven across the tarn.

20220122_122450
No swimming! No difficulty complying with that injunction on this occasion.
20220122_122952
Levers Water Beck.
20220122_124143
Levers Water Beck again.
20220122_124323
I love these constructed paths, associated with the mine-workings. I followed this one around to Low Water Beck and the Pudding Stone.
20220122_125515
Low Water Beck.

Stepping off the path by Low Water Beck, to let a couple past who were coming the other way and who seemed a bit nervous of the uneven and slippery surface, I skidded on the wet grass and went arse-over-tit. They seemed quite concerned about me, I’m not sure whether that was despite or because of the fact that I was laughing at my own clumsiness.

20220122_130340
Another mine track.
20220122_134329
Sod’s Law in operation – as I sat in my car finishing my flask and eating my lunch, sunshine appeared down in the valley, bringing a feeble rainbow with it.

A surprisingly enjoyable outing, all told. And the fact that I shall need to go back to pick up Dow Crag, Grey Friar etc is not a hardship at all.

The Old Man in the Rain

More Than Enough

20211002_122524

UF was up from Manchester since we had tickets to see Martin Simpson and Martin Taylor at the Brewery Arts in Kendal. I invited TC to bring his dogs out for a walk around the village with us. We started in Eaves Wood with a visit to the Pepper Pot, then walked through Burton Well Wood and across Lambert’s Meadow. The fact that I have no photographs is, I think, a good indication of how poor the weather was. In the photo above, we are at the now decrepit bench at the top of the hill at Myer’s Allotment. Even on a wet day there was a bit of a view over Leighton Moss…

20211002_122458

We dropped down through Fleagarth Wood to Jenny Brown’s Point, where, since it had stopped raining and the sand was reasonably firm, we decided to walk around the coast back to the village.

20211002_134124

It was bracingly windy and rather splendid.

20211003_154108
Ink Caps, I think.

The next morning, a Sunday, UF made an early exit to make a prior engagement. Usually, when he makes a Sunday flit, he’ll be playing snap – the variant that has ‘seven no trumps’ and the like – or watching City play, but, if I remember right, on this occasion he was meeting friends for a walk. It might have been a good one, because the weather was much brighter, with big clouds, plenty of sunshine and heavy showers tracking in off the Bay. Having said that, I didn’t set out for a walk until late afternoon, so it’s possible I’d been waiting for the weather to improve.

20211003_154255
20211003_154402
20211003_154553
20211003_154846

I managed to string a five mile route out over nearly three hours. Tea breaks to sit and watch the showers falling elsewhere were the order of the day.

20211003_160302
20211003_160723

At Far Arnside, I spent some time looking for the fossilised corals in the rocks on the edge of the Bay; something I hadn’t done for quite some time.

20211003_160814
20211003_160823
20211003_161455
20211003_165235
Clougha Pike and Ward’s Stone from Heathwaite.
20211003_170038
20211003_171106
20211003_171521
Kent Estuary and Whitbarrow from Arnside Knott.
20211003_171812
Humphrey Head.

I was surprised to get to the top of Arnside Knott without being caught by any showers. Perhaps I celebrated too soon: as I began to descend, it finally started to rain on me.

20211003_172617

It was short lived though, and brought a rainbow with it.

20211003_174847
Mushroom cloud formation above Heysham Nuclear Power Plant. Hmmm.
20211003_180152
20211003_180806
Late light on the houses of Townsfield.
20211003_181426
Almost home. More rain and another rainbow.

Here’s the two Martins, performing a song from Martin Simpson’s repertoire, written, I think, by his father-in-law. It seems highly appropriate for these ‘Eat or Heat’ times.

More Than Enough

Duke of Burgundies, A Holly Blue, An Osprey, Iridescent Clouds, an Interloper.

20210516_101518
TBH in Bottoms Wood

A post to take me a bit further through May. These first six photos were all taken on the same Sunday. I was out for an early walk with TBH, then took B to rugby training in Kirkby, a chance for another brief wander, and finally had a short stroll, which took a long time, around Gait Barrows.

20210516_115826
River Lune near Kirkby Lonsdale
P1330537
Herb Paris in the woods at Gait Barrows
P1330557
A pair of Duke of Burgundy butterflies

Obviously, Duke of Burgundy butterflies are like buses; I’ve waited years to see one, then two come along at once. Seeing me with my camera, a fellow enthusiast asked if I was looking for Duke of Burgundies? And when I replied; ‘That would be nice’, he pointed out where I could find a pair on one of the ropes which cordoned off the path.

“Hurry,” he said, “I’ve been watching them there for 45 minutes. I don’t know how much longer they’ll stay.”

Long enough for me to take lots of almost identical photos! What surprised me was how tiny they were – this is a really diminutive species of butterfly. Perhaps that’s why I’ve found them so hard to spot? They didn’t move at all, so intent on mating were they, so I didn’t get to see their upperwings. Maybe next May.

Duke of Burgundy butterflies are seriously in decline. Here’s the distribution map:

You can see that our population is very much an isolated North-Western outpost. The wonderful Back On Our Map project (BOOM!) are aiming to reintroduce or spread a number of rare species in the area, including Dormice and possibly Pine Martens. At Gait Barrows huge efforts have been made to encourage Primroses and Cowslips which are the food-plants of the Duke of Burgundy caterpillars.

20210516_153901
Big skies over Gait Barrows
P1330567
Iridescent clouds above Farleton Fell.

Here’s a curious phenomena which I don’t think I’ve ever seen before – rainbow colours in the sky, but not in a rainbow arc. Sadly, none of the photos I took showed the colours very clearly, but you can just about see them here in this enhanced shot. Fascinating to see; due to tiny ice-particles diffracting the light apparently.

P1330572
Another view of Farleton Fell.

One evening whilst A was at a dance lesson, I made a first visit to Hale Moss nature reserve. There were lots of snails and a few Bird’s-eye Primroses dotted about the boggy open ground.

P1330578
Hale Moss.
20210518_130800
Holly Blue butterfly, photographed in the grounds at work.

Not much more to say about that one. Not the first Holly Blue I’ve seen, but the first I’ve seen locally. Probably, I think because they’re another small butterfly, and because they tend to fly quite high in the tree-tops.

P1330586
Reed Bunting at Foulshaw Moss.
P1330608
Male Great-spotted Woodpecker (the females don’t have the red patch on their nape)
P1330639
Two male Redpolls.
P1330664
Foulshaw Moss.

I was standing on the raised platform at Foulshaw Moss which gives great views over the wetland, when a large white bird flew directly overhead from behind me. By the time I’d got my camera pointing in the right direction, the bird had already travelled a long way, but it was still obviously an Osprey.

P1330660
Osprey

The Wildlife Trust had webcams stationed over the nest at Foulshaw and through the spring and early summer I periodically watched the adults and then the chicks. Still special to see the bird ‘in the flesh’ though.

P1330666
Osprey being harried by a Crow.
P1330676
Perched Osprey.
P1330690
Two more views of Foulshaw Moss.
P1330691
P1330674
Sedge Warbler.

This bird was bobbing about in the reeds beneath the platform, singing enthusiastically. I think the prominent eye-stripe makes this a Sedge Warbler. I took lots of photos, but none were quite as sharp as I would have liked.

20210518_205414

And finally, this also flew overhead that same evening whilst I was at Foulshaw Moss – ironically, I think that this is an Osprey too: a Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey. The rotors tilt so that it can take off, land and manoeuvre like a helicopter, but also fly like a plane. But what is an American military aircraft doing flying over Cumbria? Well, RAF Alconbury, RAF Fairford, RAF Lakenheath, RAF Mildenhall, RAF Menwith Hill, RAF Croughton – all US run bases in the UK apparently. None of them are near here, but I guess it must have come from one of them? Good to know that we’re still living in Airstrip One. When will we be ‘taking back control’ of military bases on our ‘sovereign’ territory? Don’t hold your breath.

Duke of Burgundies, A Holly Blue, An Osprey, Iridescent Clouds, an Interloper.

Hanging On Me

20210125_121022

A new traffic light had been installed at Waterslack where a footpath crosses the railway line. I suggested to the Network Rail engineer, who was there testing the lights, that I could claim the privilege of being the first to use the crossing, but he told me that they’d already been on for 20 minutes and that he had crossed several times, which made him first.

He was wrong, obviously.

I realised yesterday that I’ve been writing posts about this January since the start of June. So two months to write up one: this is obviously not sustainable! At this rate, there’ll come a point pretty soon where I’m exactly a year behind and it will seem like I’m strangely in sync. January, as Pilot used to sing, has been hanging on me.

20210125_122027
Hawes Water

Clearly, this won’t do – so back to portmanteau posts. This one winds-up the final week of the month, glossing over a couple of walks when the weather was a bit grim and the light not so suited to taking photos.

20210125_122418
Hawes Water Summer House, newly restored and turned into a visitor centre. At the time it was still locked up and, I realise, I still haven’t been in. I wonder if it’s open yet? Maybe I’ll have a look tomorrow morning!

No such problems on the Monday, when I had another long lunch break walk.

20210125_122606

It was still cold, and the edges of Hawes Water were partially frozen over.

I headed for the ‘top’ of the limestone pavements…

20210125_130351

…and settled down for some soup and a cup of tea (in the insulated mug)…

20210125_130614

I was sitting in a favourite spot of mine, close to a small set of steps which have a rustic handrail…

20210125_131821
P1320940

This Robin seemed intent on joining me for my repast. Sadly, I didn’t have any bread to share.

20210125_133006
A rainbow day.
20210125_133334
Snowy lakeland peaks (just about?) visible behind the trees of Gait Barrows.
20210125_140149
20210125_155547

Later, I was out again and took a turn by The Cove and The Lots.

20210129_160731

On the Friday, after work, TBH and I were out by Hawes Water again and were rewarded by some stunning late-afternoon light.

20210129_160943
Hawes Water.
20210129_162122
20210129_162131
20210129_162202
20210130_161013

I was back that way, on my own, on the Saturday, presumably to capture the obligatory Snowdrops picture.

20210130_170543

It was a walk which finished quite late!

On the Sunday we repeated our usual circuit of Jenny Brown’s Point, but the weather wasn’t up to much. And that’s January dealt with. Oh, oh, oh, it’s magic!


And so to a tune. Something by Pilot? Ex-members of the Bay City Rollers? Not on my watch.

Hanging On Me

Warrendale Knotts

20201219_110452
Above Settle.

The weekend before Christmas, when we would, in normal circumstances, be gathered together for a wet weekend of overeating, anecdote bingo, and maybe a bit of walking. Obviously that couldn’t happen last year. At least we could meet up for a walk. Sadly, the Surfnslide crew were self-isolating and weren’t able to join us.

20201219_111410
Rainbow over Settle. Glad I got that sheet of corrugated iron in the foreground!

We met in Settle with a view to climb Warrendale Knotts. I suggested we divert slightly from our planned itinerary to take a look at Scaleber Force…

20201219_115954
Scaleber Force.

I’d noticed that a small section of woodland here is access land, and that a right-of-way drops down to the bottom of the falls and then abruptly stops.

20201219_120356
The EWO and Scaleber Force.

I think you’ll agree, it was worth a little out-and-back along a minor lane to see it. We found a likely spot, out of the wind, for an early lunch spot, thinking shelter might be at a premium later in the walk. Naturally, once we’d settled down, it began to rain. This seems to have been a recurring theme when we’ve met for walks of late.

20201219_124328
Pendle Hill. Plus more corrugated iron.
20201219_124340
High Hill Lanethat’s High Hill straight ahead.

It brightened up and we had a lovely sunny spell back along High Hill Lane.

But it was soon grey and wet again. It was that sort of day.

20201219_130456
Warrendale Knotts.

The route we took up Warrendale Knotts proved to be ridiculously steep near the top, but it was well worth the effort…

20201219_133320
Attermire Scar from Warrendale Knotts. The distant big hole in the middle of the picture is Victoria Cave.
20201219_133745
On Warrendale Knotts.

We spent quite some time on this modest top. It was very windy, but with the clouds scudding across the views were constantly changing and very dramatic.

20201219_133710
Crepuscular Rays.
20201219_134127
Warrendale Knotts and Attermire Scar. Rye Loaf Hill on the right.
20201219_134305
Pen-y-ghent
20201219_134551
Pen-y-ghent and one of the cairns on Warrendale Knotts. Is that Fountains Fell in the cloud on the right?
20201219_134636
Leaving the top.
20201219_134706

Eventually, we had to move on. In fact, the Cheshire contingent had some pressing engagement and we chose to walk with them, initially at least, and so by-passed Victoria Cave.

20201219_135532
Another view of Pen-y-ghent.

The weather deteriorated again, but the Adopted Yorkshire Woman assured us that she remembered a shelter, or possibly a cave, in the vicinity of Jubilee Cave, which would be kitted out with comfortable benches and provide a pleasant dry spot for another lunch stop. Sadly, it never materialised. Hard words may have been spoken about the vividness of the AYW’s imagination.

20201219_142302
Jubilee Cave.

AT Jubilee Cave, the Cheshire crew left us to take a direct route back to Settle, whilst the remainder of our small party returned to Settle via Winskill and Langcliffe. That’s a very pleasant route, but I didn’t take any more photos, because the rain returned and this time it meant business. We did enjoy a brief dry spell and had a hurried stop in order to drain the dregs from our flasks, but by the time we reached the cars it was chucking it down. A small price to pay for a terrific walk though.

The day before this walk I uninstalled and reinstalled MapMyWalk. It worked, so here’s the resultant map. I think the numbers are kilometres, although the 4 and 6 seem a bit odd?
Warrendale Knotts, not named on the OS 1:50,000 is the trig pillar with a psot height of 440m.

I’ve never climbed Warrendale Knotts before, and I still haven’t been up Rye Loaf Hill. Looking at the map of the Dales, it also occurs to me that I haven’t been up Great Shunner Fell or Buckden Pike or Fountains Fell since the mid-eighties. Which seems criminal given that they’re all relatively close to home. Aside from the Three Peaks area, the closest bit to home, I’ve been neglecting the Dales. I have a lot of exploring to do!

Warrendale Knotts

November: On the Home Patch

20201106_162354
Sunset from The Cove
20201106_163329
Post sunset light from The Lots

People were going further afield for their daily exercise. I knew this. Every day we drove past the Eaves Wood car park and it was full. I could read about it on blogs. People I met on my walks recounted trips to the Dales and the Lakes.

20201106_163333
Post sunset light from The Lots

And I would be doing the same. Soon, very soon.

20201107_134735
Tree trunk near the mouth of the Kent.

But somehow, I didn’t get around to it.

20201107_154159
Flooded fields from Arnside Knott

I wasn’t particularly worried about what might happen, or any potential consequences.

20201107_161645
Late afternoon skies from Castlebarrow…

I’m a creature of habit. I just seemed to be stuck in a rut of sorts.

20201113_170343
And The Cove.
20201114_141118
Fungi.

Still, there are worse ruts to be in!

20201114_141823

I was still getting out a lot. Frequent visits to The Cove, The Pepper Pot, and around Jenny Brown’s Point, usually with TBH.

20201115_105355

The weather was a bit mixed, to say the least.

20201115_114142
“See that storm over yonder, it’s gonna rain all day.”

This was a memorable walk. The tide was exceptionally high. So much so that we had to turn back and couldn’t get around Jenny Brown’s because the the salt marsh was inundated.

20201115_114215
All of this is usually green!

It was also very windy and squally, with very heavy showers.

20201115_114412
20201115_114806
20201115_115723

We walked across Quaker’s Stang which was completely exposed to the wind off the sea, and made for very bracing walking.

20201115_115951
The RSPB car park for Allan and Morecambe hides was flooded.
20201115_121936
More fungi.
20201115_132935
Waves (of a fashion) at Jack Scout.
20201119_163948
The lights of Heysham and Morecambe from The Cove.
20201121_150921
Another high tide at Jack Scout.
20201122_121851
The salt marsh when it isn’t underwater! Warton Crag behind.
20201122_122633
Warton Crag again, across Quicksand Pool.
20201122_124036
Jack Scout Rainbow.
20201122_155121
Towering cloud catching late light from The Cove.
20201128_125916
Arnside Prom.

So – I’ve dismissed November with a solitary post again.

What would break my out of my routine? I needed an external stimulus, an intervention you might say…


Here’s something I haven’t done for a while – a tune for the end of the post. I absolute love the interplay of voices on this Levon Helm track….

November: On the Home Patch

October 2020: More Showers, Rainbows, and Big Clouds.

20201020_171042
The view from Castlebarrow.

The title pretty much sums it up. Photos from lots of different local walks, taken during the second half of October. I was aware that some people were beginning to travel a little further afield for their exercise, but somehow my own radius of activity seemed to shrink to local favourite spots not too far from the village.

20201022_162959
Crepuscular rays on the Bay.
20201023_172613
Rainbow over The Lots

This is my mate D and his pug. I often meet him when I’m out for a local walk. I think I’ve mentioned before how much bumping into neighbours whilst out and about has helped during the lockdown in all of it guises.

20201023_172926
The sun dips towards the sea, from Castle Barrow.

I can’t remember exactly when this happened – let’s assume it was October: I bumped into a chap carrying a fair bit of camera gear in Eaves Wood. He asked if he was going the right way to the Pepper Pot. He was. I saw him again on the top. It turned out he’s working on a book, one in a series, about where to take photos from in the North-West. Based in Lancaster, he’d never been to the Pepper Pot before. Funny how that can happen. Cloud had rolled in and the chances of a decent sunset looked a bit poor. I saw him again, a few weeks later, this time he’d set up his camera and tripod a little further West, in a spot I’d suggested. I hope he got his sunset.

20201025_091037
A paper round rainbow. Just prior to a proper drenching.
20201025_130134
TBH in Eaves Wood.
20201025_132317
Among all the changes which Natural England have been carrying out at Gait Barrows – raising the water level, felling trees, removing fences, putting up new fences in other places etc, they’ve also renovated this old summer house by Hawes Water. Presently, it’s still locked, but eventually it will be an information centre and a vantage point to look out over the lake.
20201026_105647
Around this time, TBH started to take a regular weekend walk together around Jenny Brown’s Point. It was interesting to watch the channel from Quicksand Pool change each week and to contrast the weather and the tides each week.
20201026_111023
Traveller’s Joy by Jenny Brown’s Point.
20201026_152607
From Castlebarrow, heavy showers tracking in from The Bay.
20201026_152552
Late sun from Castlebarrow again.
20201026_172136
The lights of Grange from The Cove.
20201027_065519
Sunrise from our garden.
20201027_170908
TBH by the Pepper Pot on Castlebarrow.
20201027_171157
Post sunset from Castlebarrow.
20201027_173213
The last of the light from The Cove.
20201028_080130
Silverdale Moss from the rim of Middlebarrow Quarry. It had just finished raining, or was just about to rain, or probably both.
20201028_080823
Autumnal birches with a rainbow behind.
20201028_092248
The Shelter Stone Trowbarrow Quarry.
20201028_100020
Leighton Moss from Myer’s Allotment.
20201028_100515
20201028_103107
20201028_152436
The Copper Smelting Works Chimney near Jenny Brown’s and more heavy showers.
20201028_152547
Jenny Brown’s Cottages.
20201029_070809
The Bay from The Cove on a very grey day!
20201029_074625
Cows in the rain.

The brown cow at the back here is a bull. I’d walked through the fields on Heald Brow where they were grazing a few times and he’d never batted an eyelid. But on this day he and a few of his harem where stationed in a gateway. I was considering my options and wondering whether to turn back, but when I got within about 50 yards the bull suddenly started to run. At quite a canter. Fortunately, it was away from me and not towards – he was obviously even more of a wuss than me!

20201029_074641
A White-lipped Snail – the rain isn’t universally disliked.
20201030_130650
Clougha across the Bay.
P1320738
Little Egret.
P1320732
The yellow feet are a good distinguishing feature.
20201030_131956
20201030_133958
Picnic lunch – apple, mushroom soup and a selection of cheeses.

I decided that the best way to make the most of sometimes limited windows at weekends was to head out in the middle of the day and to eat somewhere on my walk. This bench overlooking the Kent Estuary was a particular favourite. Haven’t been there for a while now – must rectify that.

20201030_141529
The tide had heaped up fallen leaves in a long sinuous line.
20201030_143533
Scot’s Pines on Arnside Knott.
20201030_144239
Birches on Arnside Knott.
20201030_145301
Whitbarrow from Arnside Knott.
20201030_145933
River Kent from Arnside Knott.
20201030_150621
A flooded Silverdale Moss from Arnside Knott. Ingleborough in the background
20201030_154048
Arnside Tower.
20201031_162516
Clouds catching late light.
October 2020: More Showers, Rainbows, and Big Clouds.

October 2020: Rainbow Days

20201004_154536
If you click on this image and then zoom in, you’ll see that the Howgill Fells had a dusting of snow.

Last year, when I got behind with the blog, I dealt with the previous October with a single brief post. Not this time. Last October deserves at least 2 posts.

20201004_161946
Eaves Wood

So, what did I get up to last October? Well, I certainly got out for a lot of walks; almost exclusively from home. I took a lot of photos, generally of cloudy skies, often with a rainbow thrown in for good measure.

20201004_162308

My brolly became my constant companion and my favourite bit of walking kit. It was windy too mind, and my umbrella was turned inside out on a couple of occasions. Which trauma it seems to have survived without any noticeable loss of function.

20201006_165659
Challan Hall and double rainbow.

B took over A’s Saturday morning paper-round, then offered to stand in on Sundays too for his friend E, at which point an ongoing knee problem flared up leaving him unable to walk, requiring surgery and a lengthy convalescence, so muggins ended up doing both rounds. At least I got an early walk in at the weekends. And often an early soaking. I was initially at bit slow finding all of the houses on the rounds, so much so that, on one occasion, the Newsagent sent out search parties. I think I was eventually forgiven – she took pity on me after seeing me doing my drowned rat impression so often.

20201006_170143
Hawes Water and rainbow.
20201006_171350
20201008_171337
Eaves Wood from by Hagg Wood.
20201009_174705
The Bay looking moody.
20201009_182239
Sunset from near Hagg Wood.
20201010_101814
Rennie’s Aqueduct, taking the Lancaster Canal over the River Lune. Why was I in Lancaster? I can’t recall.
20201010_100604
P1320718
P1320719
Early mist rising off Hawes Water.
20201011_083723
Clearly, it wasn’t always cloudy.
20201011_091127
This has become a bit of a new favourite view, with the Lakeland Fells seen over the woods of Gait Barrows.
20201011_095213
In Eaves Wood.
20201011_115154
Ruskin’s View.

Rugby training, without contact, resumed for B, until the knee injury put a stop to that, which is why I was in Kirkby Lonsdale.

20201011_120839
Fungi intent in taking over a Luneside park in Kirkby.
20201011_145208
Looking toward the distant Howgills.
20201015_173838
Usually when I take photos of Roe Deer in the garden, I use my camera’s zoom to bring them closer. This was taken on my phone, since I hadn’t realised that the deer were there. They eventually hopped over the fence, but were unusually nonchalant about my presence.
20201015_181235
October 2020: Rainbow Days

Five Photos

P1250283

A wasp’s nest on the underside of the roof of our summer house (glorified shed). It was a little bit larger than a golf ball. The has been empty for weeks – it was right by the door, perhaps too busy a spot, and the wasps seemed to have abandoned it – but just today we noticed that the nest is once again occupied.

P1250288

Orchids on the Lots.

P1250294

A double rainbow from our garden; a fair indication of the weather we’ve been having this ‘summer’.

P1250333

A roe deer buck on our garden.

P1250330

He has very lop-sided antlers. I wonder whether that will put him at any disadvantage during the imminent rut?

Five photos taken on different days, aside from the last two obviously.

Five Photos