Terracotta Warriors.

image

A few less photos in this post compared to the last (mammoth) one. Not that there wasn’t just as much of interest to see at the World Museum in Liverpool, in particular in their Terracotta Warriors exhibition, but it was quite dark in the exhibition, and extremely busy, so I didn’t take many photos and of those I took most are quite blurred.

image

The exhibition, which covered a substantial period of Chinese history and several generations of royal tomb burials, was absolutely fascinating. I was particularly struck by this huge bronze bowl, which weighs 212kg and was buried on top of a pit filled with terracotta strongmen and acrobats – apparently the bowl would have been lifted by strongmen as part of a performance.

image

We’ve been to the World Museum before, in fact this was Little S’s fourth visit, since we recommended the Egyptology section of the museum to the local primary school. On this occasion, we were joined by family fried X-Ray who’d expressed an interest in seeing the exhibition way back at the start of the year when we booked the tickets. The World Museum is always a great place to visit and we did the full tour again, including a planetarium show. We were hoping to have time to visit Liverpool’s Central Library again too, and/or the Walker Art Museum, but didn’t, partly due to the all too familiar incompetence of Northern Rail (I’ll spare you the details).

 

Advertisements
Terracotta Warriors.

Mouse Will Play

Eaves Wood – Arnside Tower – Far Arnside – Park Point – White Creek – Blackstone Point – New Barns – Copridding Wood – Arnside Knott – Redhill Woods – Hagg Wood – Black Dyke – Silverdale Moss – Gait Barrows – Hawes Water – Moss Lane – Redbridge Lane – The Row – Hagg Wood

P1210721

Big clouds and the beach at Far Arnside.

The best day of my solo week was the Thursday, which was windy and changeable, but which also brought quite a bit of sunshine. Because the forecast wasn’t great, I decided to stay close to home again.

P1210722

Sloes.

Last autumn, I collected some sloes with a view to making some sloe gin. I was a bit early and the sloes hadn’t had their first frost yet, but I’d read that you can just stick them in the freezer and achieve the same affect, which I duly did. I’m sure that I warned TBH about the sloes. Well, fairly sure. Anyway, she forgot, and added the sloes to her breakfast smoothie one morning, thinking they were frozen blueberries. The resulting smoothie was more crunchy than smooth, being full of bits of the stones from the sloes and it was also mouth-puckeringly tart.

P1210724

Marooned tree-trunk.

P1210725

I’ve posted pictures of these fossilised corals from Far Arnside a couple of times before.

P1210728

They aren’t always easy to find, which doesn’t make much sense, I know, but I was pleased to find them again on this occasion and spent a happy few moments seeking them out on the rocks.

P1210738

Vervain?

This delicate and inconspicuous plant bears slender spikes of pale lilac flowers. It is hard to understand why our ancestors regarded such a modest and unassuming plant as immensely powerful.

from Hatfield’s Herbal by Gabrielle Hatfield

P1210740

Can’t think that I’ve noticed this plant before, but there was quite a bit of it blowing about in the stiff wind on the rocks hard by the shore. It was apparently sacred to the Druids, widely regarded as a panacea in the Middle Ages, and thought to be both used by witches and proof against witchcraft.

P1210742

Looking along the shore towards Grange.

P1210745

A similar view taken not too much after the previous photo. You can see that the weather was very changeable.

P1210755

Burnett Rosehip.

P1210759

The Kent Estuary.

P1210760

A Tellin. I don’t know whether it’s a Thin Tellin or a Baltic Tellin, but I was interested to read that the creatures which occupy these shells can live beneath the sand at densities of up to 3000 per cubic metre.

P1210763

A shower on the far bank.

P1210773

P1210793

Meathop Fell across the Kent – bathed in sunshine again.

P1210810

The Kent at New Barns.

P1210812

Big Clouds over Meathop Fell.

After our stay in the Tarn Gorge, where most flowers seemed to have already gone over to seed, I was on the look-out to see what was still in bloom at home. The refreshing answer was that there was so many things flowering that I soon lost count.

P1210816

Sea Plantain.

P1210823

A Hoverfly on a Hawk’s-beard. I wish I could be more specific, but Britain has several species of Hawk’s-beard and over 250 kinds of hoverfly and I can’t be sure about either of these.

P1210826

P1210830

Mallards.

P1210838

Sea Campion.

P1210839

Another hoverfly – possibly Helophilus Pendulus.

P1210854

And yet another kind, also unidentified.

P1210847

Creeping Thistle and, I think, a Mason Bee (22 resident British species).

P1210849

Mason bees, although closely related to social wasps, are solitary hunters which stock their nests with various insects to feed their larvae.

P1210857

Sea Aster.

P1210856

P1210859

Yet another kind of hoverfly, perhaps a Drone Fly, this time on Yarrow.

P1210865

And another, on Common Knapweed, I think.

P1210872

This has been quite a year for fungi, and this walk was no exception, with many different sizes, colours and forms seen.

P1210877

A rather faded Brown Argus butterfly.

This area is unusual because it’s on the northern limit of the Brown Argus and the southern limit of the Northern Brown Argus, but has both species. I’ve rarely seen either though, so this was a bit of a bonus.

In Greek mythology, Argus was a giant with a hundred eyes.

P1210887

P1210888

More fungi.

P1210891

Bedeguar Galls, home to wasp grubs.

P1210892

P1210900

Common Darter, this colouration is typical of older females.

P1210911

The view from the Knott, excellent though it was, was curtailed somewhat by clouds obscuring the larger hills of the the Lake District, which, to some extent at least, justified my decision not to head for the hills for a walk.

I stopped for half an hour, to sit on a bench and make a brew. I chatted to a couple of chaps I’d met earlier in the walk and was also befriended by a wasp, which was apparently fascinated by my phone and insisted on crawling all over it.

P1210924

A bumblebee on what looks like Marsh Woundwort, although it wasn’t growing in a remotely marshy spot.

P1210921

P1210926

Blackberries – I ate plenty during this walk.

P1210929

A male Small White (I think).

P1210931

That bumblebee again. I can’t see any pollen-baskets, so is it a male or a Cuckoo Bee?

image

Arnside Knott pano (click on this, or nay other, image to see larger version on flickr.

P1210942

Bittersweet.

P1210950

Painted Lady.

P1210955

Leighton Beck.

P1210964

Greater plantain.

A common plant with many names: Broad-leaved Plantain, Rat’s-tail Plantain, Banjos, Angel’s Harps. To the Anglo-Saxons it was Waybread, one of their nine sacred herbs and another powerful medicinal plant. I remember playing with these as a child – gently pulled away from the plant, a leaf would bring with several long thin fibres – the challenge was to get longer ‘guitar strings’ than your friends. Who needs Fortnite?

P1210965

P1210968

It wasn’t only me enjoying the blackberries!

P1210969

Heron.

P1210972

Middlebarrow and Arnside Knott.

P1220001

Unidentified Umbellifer.

P1220005

Arnside Knott across Silverdale Moss.

P1220006

Little Egret.

P1220020

These look like mutant Blackberries, but in fact they are a related species: Dewberries. They have fewer segments and are so juicy that they tend to disintegrate when picked. In my opinion, they’re superior to blackberries. They’re apparently more common in Eastern England, but I now know several spots where they grow.

P1220026

Speckled Wood.

P1220027

Orpine.

P1220038

More fungi.

P1220054

Grasshopper (possibly Common Green Grasshopper).

P1220056

This is the field adjacent to the one where I found lots of mushrooms just a couple of days before. All along this track there was a new rash of small mushrooms.

P1220059

A little later I passed through another field with, if anything, even more mushrooms.

P1220074

P1220081

Banded snail.

P1220083

P1220085

Of course, mushrooms are fine in the field, but even better with a piece of rump steak and a creamy blue cheese sauce….

P1220097

Fine way to finish a fine day.

Mouse Will Play

As The Crow Flies

Eaves Wood – Castlebarrow – The Row – Bank Well – Lambert’s Meadow – Burtonwell Wood – The Green – The Clifftop – Woodwell – Bottom’s Wood – The Lots – The Cove.

P1210707

A dull and damp day, so I didn’t take all that many photos, except of the host of insects which were feeding on a clump of Devil’s-bit Scabious at the edge of Lambert’s Meadow. None of them came out too sharply, but I’ve chosen this one of a hoverfly because I liked the neat pattern on it’s abdomen.

P1210713

Red Bartsia.

P1210714

P1210715

Water Mint.

P1210717

Speckled Wood.

And finally, not really relevant to this post, but here’s a song by the brilliant Tony Joe White, who died last week…

It seems odd to me that he wasn’t better known.

As The Crow Flies